Best TOP Enterprise Network Firewalls by Gartner

Best TOP Enterprise Network Firewalls by Gartner

What are Enterprise Network Firewalls?

Vendors and Products

Reviews

Overall Rating
0 to 5

Fortinet FortiGate - Enterprise Firewall

Fortinet

FortiGate – Enterprise Firewall

Cisco Adaptive Security Appliance Adaptive Security Device Manager (ASDM) ASA 5500-X Series Cisco Firepower

Cisco

Adaptive Security Appliance
Adaptive Security Device Manager (ASDM)
ASA 5500-X Series
Cisco Firepower

Palo Alto Networks KVM/OpenStack (Centos/RHEL, Ubuntu) PA-200 PA-220 PA-3000 Series PA-3200 Series PA-500 PA-5000 Series PA-5200 Series PA-7050 VM Series VM-Series for AWS VMware ESXi and NSX and vCloud Air
Palo Alto NetworksKVM/OpenStack (Centos/RHEL, Ubuntu)
PA-200
PA-220
PA-3000 Series
PA-3200 Series
PA-500
PA-5000 Series
PA-5200 Series
PA-7050
VM Series
VM-Series for AWS
VMware ESXi and NSX and vCloud Air
Check Point Software Technologies Check Point Next Generation Threat Prevention Appliances Check Point Security Gateway Virtual Edition (vSEC) Next Generation Firewall

Check Point Software Technologies

Check Point Next Generation Threat Prevention Appliances
Check Point Security Gateway Virtual Edition (vSEC)
Next Generation Firewall

Juniper Networks SRX Series vSRX Series

Juniper Networks

SRX Series
vSRX Series

Sophos Cyberoam (CR Series) Cyberoam XG Series Sophos XG Firewall UTM 220

Sophos

Cyberoam (CR Series)
Cyberoam XG Series
Sophos XG Firewall
UTM 220

Forcepoint Forcepoint NGFW Forcepoint Sidewinder(Legacy)

Forcepoint

Forcepoint NGFW
Forcepoint Sidewinder(Legacy)

Barracuda Networks Barracuda NextGen Firewalls Barracuda NextGen Firewalls (F series)

Barracuda Networks

Barracuda NextGen Firewalls
Barracuda NextGen Firewalls (F series)

4.6
SonicWall SonicWall NSA Series SonicWall NSv Series SonicWall SuperMassive 9000 Series

SonicWall

SonicWall NSA Series
SonicWall NSv Series
SonicWall SuperMassive 9000 Series

4.2
WatchGuard WatchGuard Firebox M Series XTM

WatchGuard

WatchGuard Firebox M Series
XTM

32
Sangfor Sangfor Next-Generation Firewall

Sangfor

Sangfor Next-Generation Firewall

   4.7
Hillstone Networks Hillstone CloudHive Micirosegmentation Solution Hillstone E-Series Next-Generation Firewalls Hillstone T-Series Intelligent Next-Generation Firewalls

Hillstone Networks

Hillstone CloudHive Micirosegmentation Solution
Hillstone E-Series Next-Generation Firewalls
Hillstone T-Series Intelligent Next-Generation Firewalls

  4.8
Huawei Eudemon Unified Security Gateway (USG)Huawei

Eudemon
Unified Security Gateway (USG)

 
Stormshield Stormshield Network Security

Stormshield

Stormshield Network Security

   
AhnLab TrusGuard

AhnLab

TrusGuard

New H3C H3C Network Firewall

New H3C

H3C Network Firewall

  4.6
GreyHeller ERP Firewall

GreyHeller

ERP Firewall

 3  5.0

Gartner Peer Insights reviews constitute the subjective opinions of individual end-users based on their own experiences, and do not represent the views of Gartner or its affiliates.

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List of Top Firewall Companies in India

List of Top Firewall Companies in India

List of Top Firewall Companies in India

In general, a computer appliance is a computing device with a specific function and limited configuration ability, and a software appliance is a set of computer programs that might be combined with just enough operating system (JeOS) for it to run optimally on industry standard computer hardware or in a virtual machine.

A firewall appliance is a combination of a firewall software and an operating system that is purposely built to run a firewall system on a dedicated hardware or virtual machine. These include:

  • embedded firewalls: very limited-capability programs running on a low-power CPU system,
  • software-based firewall appliances: a system that can be run in independent hardware or in a virtualised environment as a virtual appliance
  • hardware-based firewall appliances: a firewall appliance that runs on a hardware specifically built to install as a network device, providing enough network interfaces and CPU to serve a wide range of purposes. From protecting a small network (a few network ports and few megabits per second throughput) to protecting an enterprise-level network (tens of network ports and gigabits per second throughput).

Firewall software

Some firewall solutions are provided as software solutions that run on general purpose operating systems. The following table lists different firewall software that can be installed / configured in different general purpose operating systems.

 
Firewall  License  Cost and usage limits  OS
Avast Internet Security Proprietary Paid Microsoft Windows
Comodo Internet Security Proprietary Free Windows 10/8.1/8/7/Vista x32/x64, XPx32
Intego VirusBarrier Proprietary Paid Mac OS X 10.5 or later; on an Xserve
Kaspersky Internet Security Proprietary Paid / 30 day trial Windows unknown versions x32/x64
Lavasoft Personal Firewall Proprietary Paid Windows unknown versions x32/x64
Microsoft Forefront Threat Management Gateway Proprietary Discontinued Windows unknown versions x64
NetLimiter Proprietary Paid Windows 10, 8, 7 x64
Norton 360 Proprietary Paid Windows unknown versions x32/x64
Online Armor
Personal Firewall Proprietary Discontinued Windows unknown versions x32/x64
Outpost
Firewall Pro Proprietary Discontinued Windows 10, 8, 7, Vista, XP x32/x64
PC Tools
Firewall Plus Proprietary Discontinued Windows unknown versions x32/x64
Sygate
Personal Firewall Proprietary Discontinued Windows unknown versions x32
Windows Firewall Proprietary Included with Windows
XP SP2 and later ALL Windows Versions x32/x64
ZoneAlarm Proprietary Free / Paid Windows 7 / Vista / XP SP3/ Windows 8, 8.1. 10 x32/x64
Netfilter/iptables GPL Free Linux kernel module
nftables GPL Free Linux kernel (>=3.13) module
Shorewall GPL Free Linux-based appliance
PeerBlock GPL Free Windows 8/8.1, 7, Vista x32/64
NPF BSD Free NetBSD kernel module
PF BSD Free *BSD kernel module
ipfirewall BSD Free *BSD package
IPFilter GPLv2 Free Package for multiple UNIX-like operating systems

Firewall appliances

In general, a computer appliance is a computing device with a specific function and limited configuration ability, and a software appliance is a set of computer programs that might be combined with just enough operating system (JeOS) for it to run optimally on industry standard computer hardware or in a virtual machine.

A firewall appliance is a combination of a firewall software and an operating system that is purposely built to run a firewall system on a dedicated hardware or virtual machine. These include:

embedded firewalls: very limited-capability programs running on a low-power CPU system,
software-based firewall appliances: a system that can be run in independent hardware or in a virtualised environment as a virtual appliance hardware-based firewall appliances: a firewall appliance that runs on a hardware specifically built to install as a network device, providing enough network interfaces and CPU to serve a wide range of purposes. From protecting a small network (a few network ports and few megabits per second throughput) to protecting an enterprise-level network (tens of network ports and gigabits per second throughput).

The following table lists different firewall appliances.

Firewall License Cost OS
Clavister Proprietary Included on all Clavister Proprietary operating system cOS Core
NGFWs
Check Point Proprietary Included on Check Point Proprietary operating system Check Point IPSO
security gateways and Gaia (Linux-based)
FortiGate Proprietary Included on all Fortigate Proprietary, FortiOS
devices
Palo Alto Networks Proprietary Included on Palo Alto Proprietary operating system PANOS
Networks firewalls
Sophos Proprietary Included on Sophos UTM Linux-based appliance
Cisco ASA Firepower Proprietary Included on all CISCO Proprietary operating system
ASA devices
Cisco PIX Proprietary Included on all CISCO Proprietary operating system
PIX devices
Juniper SSG Proprietary Included on Netscreen Proprietary operating system ScreenOS
security gateways
Juniper SRX Proprietary Included on SRX Proprietary operating system Junos
security gateways
Sonicwall Proprietary Included on Dell appliance Proprietary operating system SonicOs
Barracuda Firewall Proprietary Included Firewall Next Generation appliance Windows-based appliance
embedded firewall distribution
Cyberoam Proprietary Included Firewall Sophos appliance Windows-based appliance
embedded firewall distribution
D-Link Proprietary Included Firewall DFL Windows-based appliance
embedded firewall distribution
Endian Firewall Proprietary Free / Paid Linux-based appliance
Forcepoint NGFW Proprietary Included on all Forcepoint NGFW devices Proprietary operating system
OPNsense Simplified BSD / FreeBSD License Free / Paid FreeBSD-based appliance
firewall distribution
pfSense ESF/Apache 2.0 Free / Paid FreeBSD-based appliance
firewall distribution
Untangle GPL Free / Paid Linux/NanoBSD-based appliance
firewall distribution
Zeroshell GPL Free / Paid Linux/NanoBSD-based appliance
firewall distribution
SmoothWall GPL Free / Paid Linux-based appliance
embedded firewall distribution [4]
WinGate GPL Free / Paid Windows-based appliance
embedded firewall distribution

 

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App protection amid evolving app landscape, automated attacks

The typical modern organization, according to a joint F5-Ponemon global study, uses 765 web applications, of which, 34% are considered mission critical.

Impact-wise, when apps are attacked, 81% of respondents to the F5 Labs 2018 Application Protection Report, rated loss of availability or denial of service as “the most painful”, followed by breach of confidential or sensitive information (77%); tampering with an application (73%); and loss of personally identifiable information of customers, consumers, and employees (64%). Injection attacks against app services, account access hijacking and denial-of-service attacks have been most prevalent.

Cloud-augmented security

An army of attacker-controlled devices or thingbots are increasingly forming the attackers’ infrastructure. “It definitely is right now for distributed denial of service (DDoS),” said David Holmes, F5’s global security evangelist.

Presently, when volumetric DDoS attacks are detected by F5’s on-premises solutions, customers of the cloud-based F5 Silverline DDoS Protection will use a Hybrid Signaling feature to alert its Security Operations Center (SOC) in real-time and reroute traffic for cloud-based scrubbing. “Most DDoS attacks these days are minutes long, not days long,” Holmes added. “It might not be a great value to send somebody an alert [manually] about a giant attack coming and they don’t check their mail for 15 minutes and by the time they check it, it’s over.

“Once an organization gets to a certain size, having a DDoS strategy in place is critical. And depending on the architecture, the most obvious thing is to contract somebody like F5 to be the scrubber because [since] a year ago, we were able to mitigate a 2TB attack. Obviously, even if it is just 1Tb, only service providers can absorb that. A typical enterprise is just not going to be able to.”

The Hybrid Signaling capability can also be leveraged with the F5 BIG-IP Application Security Manager (ASM) web application firewall (WAF) on premises to determine source IP addresses that are bad actors. These can be blocked in the cloud with Silverline DDoS Protection.

WAFs remain the top means for securing applications, along with application scanning and penetration testing. Although they are not designed for bot detection and their policy-based approaches cannot adapt or scale to defend against large-scale bot attacks, it is still a preventive security control that significantly reduces the risk of web vulnerability exploitation. WAFs can be further complemented by other security controls, such as vulnerability scanning, continuous monitoring, and collaboration with the development team.

This is why F5’s standalone solutions, sitting at the intersection of all application traffic in and out of the organization, can deliver rich visibility into context, with which organizations can then apply critical WAF, DDoS prevention, and access management capabilities against advanced threats.

For example, the virtualized F5 Advanced WAF can be deployed directly from public cloud providers such as Azure or Amazon Web Services (AWS). Its Layer 7 behavioral DoS detection and mitigation enable a hands-off automated protection cycle that is continually optimized and refined.

Similarly, its proactive bot defense allows session-level detection and blocking of automated threats. On the client side, there’s protection against credential stuffing – automated attacks that use previously stolen credentials – while F5 Anti-Bot Mobile SDK integration helps to counter sophisticated bot attacks on mobile API endpoints.

TheF5 Advanced WAF can be augmented with the F5 DDoS Hybrid Defender, which has been updated to detect and defend against multi-vector and volumetric DDoS attacks across network, session, and application layers while integrating offsite cloud scrubbing.

With applications being principal gateways to critical data and lack of visibility in the application layer among the top barriers to achieving strong application security, F5 have also delivered advanced access controls (F5 Access Manager) and dedicated Secure Sockets Layer visibility with orchestration capabilities (F5 SSL Orchestrator) to help thwart sophisticated cyber attacks.

App-first approach

When Japan-based Golf Digest Online (GDO), a specialty online retailer for golfers, decided to completely transition its infrastructure into the cloud with a move to Amazon Web Services (AWS), it chose the virtual editions of several F5 products to ensure an incident-free transition.

After deploying BIG-IP ASM on AWS to screen all incoming traffic, GDO has attained the same high level of security on AWS that it had with its on-premises system. The ability to continue using an F5 partner’s BIG-IP ASM-based SOC services also offered a relief for its security resources.

Similarly, financial services company, The Motley Fool, which has been using the F5 BIG-IP Local Traffic Manager (LTM) for load balancing and availability for years, augmented its existing infrastructure with the F5 Silverline Web Application Firewall.

Western Digital’s My Cloud NAS Devices Turn Out to Be Easily Hacked

Security researchers have discovered an authentication bypass vulnerability in Western Digital’s My Cloud NAS devices that potentially allows an unauthenticated attacker to gain admin-level control to the affected devices.

Western Digital’s My Cloud (WD My Cloud) is one of the most popular network-attached storage (NAS) devices which is being used by businesses and individuals to host their files, as well as backup and sync them with various cloud and web-based services.

The WD My Cloud devices let users not only share files in a home network but its private cloud feature also allows them to access their data from anywhere around the world at any time.

However, security researchers at Securify have discovered an authentication bypass vulnerability on the WD My Cloud NAS boxes that could allow unauthenticated attackers with network access to the device to escalate their privileges to admin-level without needing to provide a password.

This would eventually allow attackers to run commands that would typically require administrative privileges and gain complete control of the affected NAS device, including their ability to view, copy, delete and overwrite any files that are stored on the device.

Here’s How Easy it is to Hack a WD My Cloud Storage Boxes

The vulnerability, designated CVE-2018-17153, resides in the way WD My Cloud creates an admin session tied to an IP address.

By simply including the cookie username=admin to an HTTP CGI request send by an attacker to the device’s web interface, the attacker can unlock admin access and gain access to all the content stored on the NAS box.

Securify researchers have also published a proof-of-concept (PoC) exploit showing how the vulnerability can be exploited with just a few lines of code.

Obviously, the exploit requires either a local network or internet connection to a WD My Cloud device in order to be run the command and bypasses the NAS device’s usual login requirements.

The researchers successfully verified the vulnerability on a Western Digital My Cloud model WDBCTL0020HWT running firmware version 2.30.172, though they claimed that this issue is not limited to the model, as most products in the My Cloud series share the same “vulnerable” code.

Securify researchers found the issue while reverse engineering the CGI binaries to look for security bugs, and reported it to Western Digital in April 2017, but did not receive any response from the company.

After almost one-and-half years of silence from Western Digital, researchers finally publicly disclosed the vulnerability, which is still unpatched.

This is not the first time Western Digital has ignored the security of its My Cloud NAS device users.

Earlier this year, a researcher publicly disclosed several vulnerabilities in Western Digital’s My Cloud NAS devices, including a hard-coded password backdoor issue in their firmware after the company did not address the issue, which was reported 180 days before making it public.

Ransomware Attack Takes Down Bristol Airport’s Flight Display Screens


Bristol Airport has blamed a ransomware attack for causing a blackout of flight information screens for two days over the weekend.

The airport said that the attack started Friday morning, taking out several computers over the airport network, including its in-house display screens which provide details about the arrival and departure information of flights.

The attack forced the airport officials to take down its systems and use whiteboards and paper posters to announce check-in and arrival information for flights going through the airport and luggage pickup points for all Friday, Saturday, and the subsequent night.

The airport also urged passengers to arrive early and “allow extra time for check-in and boarding processes,” though this two days technical meltdown caused delays in baggage handling, with customers needed to wait longer than one hour for their bags.

An airport spokesman said that the information screens went offline due to a so-called “ransomware” attack, though he confirmed that no “ransom” had been paid to get the airport systems working again.

Affected systems and flight information screens were finally restored on Sunday, officials said.

“We are grateful to passengers for their patience while we have been working to resolve issues with flight information this weekend. Digital screens are now live in arrivals and departures. Work will continue to restore complete site-wide coverage as soon as possible,” the airport tweeted on Sunday.

At the moment, it is not clear how the ransomware got into the airport systems. Bristol is carrying out an investigation to find out what happened.

New Cold Boot Attack Unlocks Disk Encryption On Nearly All Modern PCs

Security researchers have revealed a new attack to steal passwords, encryption keys and other sensitive information stored on most modern computers, even those with full disk encryption.

The attack is a new variation of a traditional Cold Boot Attack, which is around since 2008 and lets attackers steal information that briefly remains in the memory (RAM) after the computer is shut down.

However, to make the cold boot attacks less effective, most modern computers come bundled with a safeguard, created by the Trusted Computing Group (TCG), that overwrites the contents of the RAM when the power on the device is restored, preventing the data from being read.

Now, researchers from Finnish cyber-security firm F-Secure figured out a new way to disable this overwrite security measure by physically manipulating the computer’s firmware, potentially allowing attackers to recover sensitive data stored on the computer after a cold reboot in a matter of few minutes.

How Microsoft Windows and Apple Users Can Prevent Cold Boot Attacks

According to Olle and his colleague Pasi Saarinen, their new attack technique is believed to be effective against nearly all modern computers and even Apple Macs and can’t be patched easily and quickly.

The two researchers, who will present their findings today at a security conference, say they have already shared their findings with Microsoft, Intel, and Apple, and helped them explore possible mitigation strategies.

Microsoft updated its guidance on Bitlocker countermeasures in response to the F-Secure’s findings, while Apple said that its Mac devices equipped with an Apple T2 Chip contain security measures designed to protect its users against this attack.

But for Mac computers without the latest T2 chip, Apple recommended users to set a firmware password in order to help harden the security of their computers.

Intel has yet to comment on the matter.

The duo says there’s no reliable way to “prevent or block the cold boot attack once an attacker with the right know-how gets their hands on a laptop,” but suggest the companies can configure their devices so that attackers using cold boot attacks won’t find anything fruitful to steal.

Meanwhile, the duo recommends IT departments to configure all company computers to either shut down or hibernate (not enter sleep mode) and require users to enter their BitLocker PIN whenever they power up or restore their PCs.

Attackers could still perform a successful cold boot attack against computers configured like this, but since the encryption keys are not stored in the memory when a machine hibernates or shuts down, there will be no valuable information for an attacker to steal.

 

List of TOP Firewall Appliances Company in India

List of TOP Firewall Appliances Company in India

In general, a computer appliance is a computing device with a specific function and limited configuration ability, and a software appliance is a set of computer programs that might be combined with just enough operating system (JeOS) for it to run optimally on industry standard computer hardware or in a virtual machine.

A firewall appliance is a combination of a firewall software and an operating system that is purposely built to run a firewall system on a dedicated hardware or virtual machine. These include:

  • embedded firewalls: very limited-capability programs running on a low-power CPU system,
  • software-based firewall appliances: a system that can be run in independent hardware or in a virtualised environment as a virtual appliance
  • hardware-based firewall appliances: a firewall appliance that runs on a hardware specifically built to install as a network device, providing enough network interfaces and CPU to serve a wide range of purposes. From protecting a small network (a few network ports and few megabits per second throughput) to protecting an enterprise-level network (tens of network ports and gigabits per second throughput).

The following table lists different firewall appliances lists.

Firewall License Cost OS
Check Point Proprietary Included on Check Point
security gateways
Proprietary operating system Check Point IPSO
and Gaia (Linux-based)
FortiGate Proprietary Included on all Fortigate
devices
Proprietary, FortiOS
Palo Alto Networks Proprietary Included on Palo Alto
Networks firewalls
Proprietary operating system PANOS
WatchGuard Proprietary Included on all
WatchGuard firewalls
Proprietary operating system
Sophos Proprietary Included on Sophos UTM Linux-based appliance
Cisco Asa Firepower Proprietary Included on all CISCO
ASA devices
Proprietary operating system
Cisco PIX Proprietary Included on all CISCO
PIX devices
Proprietary operating system
Mcafee Firewall Proprietary Included on Intel Security Appliance Linux-based appliance
Juniper SSG Proprietary Included on Netscreen
security gateways
Proprietary operating system ScreenOS
Juniper SRX Proprietary Included on SRX
security gateways
Proprietary operating system Junos
Sonicwall Proprietary Included on Dell appliance Proprietary operating system SonicOs
Barracuda Firewall Proprietary Included Firewall Next Generation appliance Windows-based appliance
embedded firewall distribution
Cyberoam Proprietary Included Firewall Sophos appliance Windows-based appliance
embedded firewall distribution
D-Link Proprietary Included Firewall DFL Windows-based appliance
embedded firewall distribution
Endian Firewall Proprietary Free / Paid Linux-based appliance
Opendium Iceni Proprietary Free / Paid Linux-based, with optional web filtering / auditing.
IPCop GPL Free / Paid Linux-based appliance
firewall distribution
pfSense ESF/BSD Free / Paid FreeBSD-based appliance
firewall distribution
IPFire GPL Free / Paid Linux/NanoBSD-based appliance
firewall distribution
Untangle GPL Free / Paid Linux/NanoBSD-based appliance
firewall distribution
Zeroshell GPL Free / Paid Linux/NanoBSD-based appliance
firewall distribution
SmoothWall GPL Free / Paid Linux-based appliance
embedded firewall distribution
WinGate GPL Free / Paid Windows-based appliance
embedded firewall distribution
Calyptix Security BSD Free OpenBSD-based appliance
firewall distribution
Halon Security BSD Free OpenBSD-based appliance
Vantronix BSD Free OpenBSD-based appliance

 

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British Airways Hacked – 380,000 Payment Cards Compromised

British Airways, who describes itself as “The World’s Favorite Airline,” has confirmed a data breach that exposed personal details and credit-card numbers of up to 380,000 customers and lasted for more than two weeks.

So who exactly are victims?

In a statement released by British Airways on Thursday, customers booking flights on its website (ba.com) and British Airways mobile app between late 21 August and 5 September were compromised.

The airline advised customers who made bookings during that 15 days period and believe they may have been affected by this incident to “contact their banks or credit card providers and follow their recommended advice.”

British Airways stated on its Twitter account that personal details stolen in the breach included their customers’ names and addresses, along with their financial information, but the company assured its customers that the hackers did not get away with their passport numbers or travel details.

The company also said that saved cards on its website and mobile app are not compromised in the breach. Only cards that have been used by you to make booking payments during the affected period are stolen.

Although the statement released by the did not mention the number of affected customers, the company’s spokesperson confirmed to the media that some 380,000 payment cards were compromised in the breach.

Also currently, it is not clear how the data breach occurred, but some media outlets are reporting that the breach was identified when “a third party noticed some unusual activity” and informed the company about it.

A spokesperson from British Airways confirmed The Hacker News that “this is data theft, rather than a breach,” which suggests someone with privileged access to the data might have stolen it.

British Airways also informed the police and the Information Commissioner and currently reaching out to affected customers directly.

However, the company assured its customers that the security breach has now been resolved, and its website is working normally and is now safe for passengers to check-in online, and book flights online.

The National Crime Agency is aware of the British Airways data breach and is “working with partners to assess the best course of action.”

Air Canada also suffered a severe data breach late last month, which, along with personal data, also exposed passport number and other passport and travel details of about 20,000 mobile app customers.

List of top firewall companies in India

List of top firewall companies in India

In general, a computer appliance is a computing device with a specific function and limited configuration ability, and a software appliance is a set of computer programs that might be combined with just enough operating system (JeOS) for it to run optimally on industry standard computer hardware or in a virtual machine.

A firewall appliance is a combination of a firewall software and an operating system that is purposely built to run a firewall system on a dedicated hardware or virtual machine. These include:

  • embedded firewalls: very limited-capability programs running on a low-power CPU system,
  • software-based firewall appliances: a system that can be run in independent hardware or in a virtualised environment as a virtual appliance
  • hardware-based firewall appliances: a firewall appliance that runs on a hardware specifically built to install as a network device, providing enough network interfaces and CPU to serve a wide range of purposes. From protecting a small network (a few network ports and few megabits per second throughput) to protecting an enterprise-level network (tens of network ports and gigabits per second throughput).

The following table lists different firewall appliances lists.

Firewall License Cost OS
Check Point Proprietary Included on Check Point
security gateways
Proprietary operating system Check Point IPSO
and Gaia (Linux-based)
FortiGate Proprietary Included on all Fortigate
devices
Proprietary, FortiOS
Palo Alto Networks Proprietary Included on Palo Alto
Networks firewalls
Proprietary operating system PANOS
WatchGuard Proprietary Included on all
WatchGuard firewalls
Proprietary operating system
Sophos Proprietary Included on Sophos UTM Linux-based appliance
Cisco Asa Firepower Proprietary Included on all CISCO
ASA devices
Proprietary operating system
Cisco PIX Proprietary Included on all CISCO
PIX devices
Proprietary operating system
Mcafee Firewall Proprietary Included on Intel Security Appliance Linux-based appliance
Juniper SSG Proprietary Included on Netscreen
security gateways
Proprietary operating system ScreenOS
Juniper SRX Proprietary Included on SRX
security gateways
Proprietary operating system Junos
Sonicwall Proprietary Included on Dell appliance Proprietary operating system SonicOs
Barracuda Firewall Proprietary Included Firewall Next Generation appliance Windows-based appliance
embedded firewall distribution
Cyberoam Proprietary Included Firewall Sophos appliance Windows-based appliance
embedded firewall distribution
D-Link Proprietary Included Firewall DFL Windows-based appliance
embedded firewall distribution
Endian Firewall Proprietary Free / Paid Linux-based appliance
Opendium Iceni Proprietary Free / Paid Linux-based, with optional web filtering / auditing.
IPCop GPL Free / Paid Linux-based appliance
firewall distribution
pfSense ESF/BSD Free / Paid FreeBSD-based appliance
firewall distribution
IPFire GPL Free / Paid Linux/NanoBSD-based appliance
firewall distribution
Untangle GPL Free / Paid Linux/NanoBSD-based appliance
firewall distribution
Zeroshell GPL Free / Paid Linux/NanoBSD-based appliance
firewall distribution
SmoothWall GPL Free / Paid Linux-based appliance
embedded firewall distribution
WinGate GPL Free / Paid Windows-based appliance
embedded firewall distribution
Calyptix Security BSD Free OpenBSD-based appliance
firewall distribution
Halon Security BSD Free OpenBSD-based appliance
Vantronix BSD Free OpenBSD-based appliance

For Any type of Firewall Security and Support, Please call us on

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Support : 0120 2631048

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Cisco Issues Security Patch Updates for 32 Flaws in its Products

Cisco today released thirty security patch advisory to address a total of 32 security vulnerabilities in its products, three of which are rated critical, including the recently disclosed Apache Struts remote code execution vulnerability that is being exploited in the wild.

Out of the rest 29 vulnerabilities, fourteen are rated high and 15 medium in severity, addressing security flaws in Cisco Routers, Cisco Webex, Cisco Umbrella, Cisco SD-WAN Solution, Cisco Cloud Services Platform, Cisco Data Center Network, and more products.

The three critical security vulnerabilities patched by Cisco address issues in Apache Struts, Cisco Umbrella API, and Cisco RV110W, RV130W and RV215W router’s management interface.

Apache Struts Remote Code Execution Vulnerability (CVE-2018-11776)

The vulnerability, reported late last month by Semmle security researcher Man Yue Mo, resides in the core of Apache Struts and originates due to insufficient validation of user-provided untrusted inputs in the core of the Struts framework under certain configurations.

An unauthenticated, remote attacker can trigger the vulnerability by tricking victims to visit a specially crafted URL on the affected web server, allowing the attacker to execute malicious code and eventually take complete control over the targeted server running the vulnerable application.

All applications that use Apache Struts—supported versions (Struts 2.3 to Struts 2.3.34, and Struts 2.5 to Struts 2.5.16) and even some unsupported Apache Struts versions—are potentially vulnerable to this flaw, even when no additional plugins have been enabled.

Apache Struts patched the vulnerability with the release of Struts versions 2.3.35 and 2.5.17 last month. Now, Cisco has also released fixes to address the issue in its several products.

Cisco Umbrella API Unauthorized Access Vulnerability (CVE-2018-0435)

The second critical vulnerability patched by Cisco resides in the Cisco Umbrella API that could allow an authenticated, remote attacker to view and modify data across their organization as well as other organizations.

Cisco Umbrella is a cloud security platform that provides the first line of defense against threats over all ports and protocols by blocking access to malicious domains, URLs, IPs, and files before a connection is ever established or a file is downloaded.

The vulnerability resides due to insufficient authentication configurations for the API interface of Cisco Umbrella, and successful exploitation could allow an attacker to read or modify data across multiple organizations.

Cisco has patched the vulnerability addressed this vulnerability in the Cisco Umbrella production APIs. No user action is required.

Cisco Routers Management Interface Buffer Overflow Vulnerability (CVE-2018-0423)

The last, but not the least, critical vulnerability resides in the web-based management interface of the Cisco RV110W Wireless-N VPN Firewall, Cisco RV130W Wireless-N Multifunction VPN Router, and Cisco RV215W Wireless-N VPN Router that could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to execute arbitrary code or cause a DoS condition.

The flaw occurs due to improper boundary restrictions on user-supplied input in the Guest user feature of the web-based management interface.

This vulnerability affects all releases of Cisco RV110W Wireless-N VPN Firewall, RV130W Wireless-N Multifunction VPN Router, and RV215W Wireless-N VPN Router.

Cisco has addressed this vulnerability in firmware release 1.0.3.44 for the Cisco RV130W Wireless-N Multifunction VPN Router, and will not release firmware updates for the Cisco RV110W Wireless-N VPN Firewall and Cisco RV215W Wireless-N VPN Router.

According to the company’s Product Security Incident Response Team (PSIRT), Apache Struts is being exploited in the wild, while the team is not aware of any exploits leveraging the other two critical flaws.